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Willingness to Resolve

THE ULTIMATE | MIND-SHIFT

Willingness to Resolve

When we’re confronted with particularly difficult situations, it can be extremely valuable to explore our motives, our intent, and the relationship of this particular situation to other areas of our life, both past and present.
Focusing on our own reaction for a time does not mean condoning an injustice, or relinquishing a right, or denying our needs in the situation. On the contrary, looking inwards to uncover a quality, a need, or a hurt previously unknown to us may, in fact, help us to identify an appropriate and effective strategy to resolve the situation rather than being immobilised by its enormity, or being locked into a continuing unsuccessful pattern for dealing with it.

Note: We all would prefer that certain situations just went away, however even if they do they can leave a lot of emotions behind. By dealing with these situations and having a willingness to resolve them is very empowering, it also sets an example for others, from which; children, partners, families and  colleagues may also opt to making an effort to resolve, and not let things get out of hand.

Objectives: To explore reasons for being unwilling to resolve conflict.

Session Times: 3 hours:

Recommended Background:

  • The Win/Win Approach
  • Managing Emotions

FOR THINGS TO
CHANGE
FIRST I MUST
CHANGE

There are three steps to projection.

THE HOOK
THE SYMPTOM
THE PROJECTION

Resentment often arises from projection, or it may be linked to some unresolved previous conflict. It’s sometimes identified as “frozen anger”. It, too, can lead to being stuck in a conflict – neither wanting to, nor being able to resolve it.

RESENTMENT

AKNOWLEDGEMENT

Sometimes when we feel resentment towards someone, or if we’ve been deeply hurt, we need to go further than acknowledgement. Sometimes what is needed is a conscious act of forgiveness.

Exploring Forgiveness/Letting Go

How do people behave that indicates that they are unwilling to resolve a conflict?

If you were unwilling to resolve what could someone else do that might help you to become more willing?

Managing Unwillingness to Resolve in Others

When we’re confronted with particularly difficult situations, it can be extremely valuable to explore our motives, our intent, and the relationship of this particular situations to other areas of our life, both past and present.
Focusing on our own reaction for a time does not mean condoning an injustice, or relinquishing a right, or denying our needs in the situation. On the contrary, looking inwards to uncover a quality, a need, or a hurt previously unknown to us may, in fact, help us to identify an appropriate and effective strategy to resolve the conflict rather than being immobilised by its enormity, or being locked into a continuing unsuccessful pattern for dealing with it.

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